back to hpplotter

Shade levels - and what it actually means

 Quick facts

 TRUE WHITE

CREAM WHITE

BLUE WHITE

 

  • Ideal for long documents where you want to ensure the readers comfort as it minimises eyestrain
  • Ideal where images are a broad selection of colours so that it reflects all colours evenly.  A true white will also help the coloured graphics and photographs 'pop' off the page, and won't interfere with or add more colour to the images

 

  • Ideal if you have images that are mainly reddish or yellowish tones (such as sunsets, beach & desert scenes) then the cream paper will enhance the images without significantly affecting the text quality.
  • Ideal for long documents where you want to ensure the readers comfort as it minimises eyestrain


  • Ideal if you have images that are blue-toned (such as sea or sky scenes) because it will enhance the images while leaving the text crisp and clear

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


General Overview:

Shade is a measurement of the colour of the paper, commonly measured by the system known as CIE LAB (LAB formulas are often used in paint mixing).  Shade is defined using a universally accepted colour measurement model and represents the subtle differences in colour within the visible spectrum.  Technically, shade is an important characteristic when defining a papers whiteness as it can directly impact the look and feel of printed images.  There are traditionally three main groups of white shades - true white, cream white and blue white.  

Most papers are manufactured to a Blue White shade as this appears brighter and whiter to the human eye.  It absorbs warmer colours and reflects more blues or cooler colours - and they are often referred to as 'bright white' papers.  

The True White is a balanced white shade of paper which reflects the total colour spectrum equally.  A Cream White absorbs the blues and cooler colours and will usually have a yellowish tint.

Test Methods include:

A spectrophotometer or a spectrodensitometer can be used to measure shade.

 

Paper and Media